​​computer-3343887_1280.jpg

Partnering with patients in their own care

Person-centred care is the gold standard approach to healthcare delivery worldwide. Partnering with patients in their own care is an important pillar of person-centred care. It focuses on the relationship between a consumer and a clinician, recognising that trust, mutual respect and sharing of knowledge are needed for the best outcomes.

Partnerships with patients are made up of many different interrelated practices - from communication and structured listening through to shared decision making, self-management support and care planning. Patients should be partners in their own care to the extent that they choose.

Partnering with patients in their own care can improve the safety and quality of health care, improve patient outcomes and experience and improve the performance of health services.

Links for staff to distrcit level evidence are coming soon.

Healthcare rights

The Australian Charter of Healthcare rights (second edition) describes the rights that consumers, or someone they care for, can expect when receiving health care. These rights apply to all people in all places where health care is provided in Australia.

Partnering with Consumers National Standard - Action 2.3 (Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care) 
Action 2.3 requires the health service organisation to have a charter of rights that is:

  1. Consistent with the Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights
  2. Easily accessible for patients, carers, families and consumers

The intent​ of this action is that consumers are provided with information about their healthcare rights. Learn more about Health​care rights.

Informed consent

Informed consent is a person's voluntary decision about their health care that is made with knowledge and understanding of the risks and benefits involved.

Partnering with Consumers National Standard - Action 2.4 (Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care)
Action 2.4 requires the health service organisation to ensure that its informed consent processes comply with legislation and best practice.

The intent of this action is that patients are involved in appropriate informed consent processes. Learn more about informed consent.

Capacity and substitute decision maker

All adults are presumed to have the capacity to decide whether they wish to receive health care, except when it can be shown they lack the capacity to do so.  

Partnering with Consumers National Standard - Action 2.5 (Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care)
Action 2.5 requires health service organisations to have processes to identify:   

  1. The capacity of a patient to make decisions about t​heir own care
  2. A substitute decision maker if a patient does not have the capacity to make decisions for themselves
  3. The intent of this action is that patients who do not have the capacity to make decisions about their care are identified, and systems are put in place so that they, or agreed substitute decision makers, are involved in decision making, including informed consent. Learn more about Capacity and substitute decision maker.

    Shared decision making and planning care

    Shared decision making and personalised care planning are important ways in which patients can partner in their own care. 

    Partnering with Consumers National Standard - Action 2.6 (Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care) 
    Action 2.6 requires the health service organisation to have processes for clinicians to partner with patients and/or their substitute decision maker to plan, communicate, set goals and make decisions about their current and future care.

    The intent of this action is that patients receive safe and high-quality care by being involved in decisions and planning about current and future care.

    Partnering with Consumers National Standard - Action 2.7 (Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care)
    Action 2.7 requires the health service organisation to support the workforce to form partnerships with patients and carers so that patients can be actively involved in their own care.

    The intent of this action is that clinicians work with patients to enable them to be partners in their own care.

    Learn more about Shared decision making and planning care.